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Randy Houser

 
Randy Houser is a man refreshed. “I don’t know how it happened, but everything in my life has started lining up,” says the Lake, Mississippi native. “I must have done somebody right in the

past.”  Those positive vibes of renewal ripple through Houser’s newest single “Runnin’ Outta  Moonlight” and “How Country Feels,” his first radio No. 1 and Gold® certified title track from

Stoney Creek Records debut, How Country Feels, which hit stores on Tuesday, January 22, 2013.  The title track was his fastest-rising single to-date on the country radio charts and sparked a

wildfire of accolades and media appearances including: CONAN, NBC Nightly News, NBC  Weekend Today, CBS’s “On The Couch,” FOX & Friends, Better TV and many more. “It was the

obvious choice for a lead-off,” Houser says of “How Country Feels.” “It caught my ear the first  time I heard it—like, ‘I wanna hear that again.’”  Houser cut How Country Feels with producer Derek George, a long-time friend and fellow Mississippian he had wanted to work with for over a decade. It’s been called “a buoyant, hookfilled outing” (Washington Post) that’s infused with “ a balance of revelry and introspection” (Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel) and shows off Randy’s powerhouse voice, hailed

“one of the best in Nashville” by Great American Country (GAC) and numerous other critics.  Houser’s past contains no shortage of achievement, as it includes multiple nominations for ACM

and CMA Awards, a No. 2 single in the form of “Boots On,” and songwriting credits for major names such as Trace Adkins, Justin Moore and Chris Young. In 2008—mere months after the

release of his debut single, “Anything Goes”—Houser was even asked by David Letterman himself to appear on the Late Show. The singer’s first full-length, Anything Goes, came out later

that year, followed in 2010 by They Call Me Cadillac which spawned hit “Whistlin’ Dixie,” and fan-favorite “A Man Like Me.”

But despite this early success, Houser now admits that he wasn’t truly happy. “It seemed like professionally things weren’t as great as they could be, and that was part of it,” he says. “But the

biggest thing was not having a homebase. I needed an anchor.” He found one last year when he started a family and welcomed his son, West. “All of a sudden it was like I had this piece that

had been missing,” he says with audible gratitude. Shortly after, Houser signed with new label home Stoney Creek Records based in Nashville, Tenn. “Everybody there feels like part of my family,” Houser says of the independent imprint, where

he happily signed following a long stretch of intensive touring. (How intensive? Think 150 shows a year.) “You walk in the door and everybody seems really happy with their job; there’s no

strife in the air. That’s really important for me to have right now. It’s comforting.”  New tracks on How Country Feels echo the single’s sunny self-assurance, including “We’re Just

Growing Younger” and “Along for the Ride,” which Houser co-wrote with Zac Brown. “We were playing a festival and I just had this song rolling around in my head,” Houser remembers of

the latter. “I stayed up till about 5 in the morning but then got stuck. So I called up Zac and we went on his bus and knocked it out of the park.”  There is contemplation, too: “Like a Cowboy” is about “me coming home for a few days, then

having to leave again,” Houser says, while “Route 3 Box 250D” provides an intimate snapshot of

the singer’s upbringing. “That one’s kind of hard to listen to,” he admits. “It hits almost too close to home.” Billboard calls the song “stunning,” and The New York Times writes, “His voice here is

almost wholly different, thicker and more throbbing, a caldron bubbling over. For a few minutes  he’s the singer Nashville won’t let him be.  As for the sound of How Country Feels, Houser says it’s his most expansive outing yet, with more bells and whistles than he’s used in the past; it also showcases the remarkable voice that led

Vince Gill to call Houser “one of the best in the new crop of country singer-songwriters” and pal Jamey Johnson to say, “I watched a blind man jump to his feet and drop his crutches the first

time he heard Randy Houser sing.”  And since the release of How Country Feels, critics have echoed those claims in reviews, with

MSN writing “Houser is hands down one of the best male vocalists in Nashville,” and quoting  Dierks Bentley as saying, “It’s kind of ridiculous how good of a singer he is.”  Still, the heart of the album—of Houser’s entire outlook right now—remains the story of a man

who’s moved through darkness into light. “I feel like I’ve reached such a special moment,” he says, and it’s a true pleasure to hear him inside it.